trois_1.jpg
Greenery.JPG
8.jpg
Mado_fenetre.jpg
trois_1.jpg

The <Root> to Food


"Eating is part of a vast chain of ecological relationships which are easy to forget about. The food we consume starts growing somewhere, but most of us have lost the true relationship to that growth, and therefore, lost our true connection with food..."

SCROLL DOWN

The <Root> to Food


"Eating is part of a vast chain of ecological relationships which are easy to forget about. The food we consume starts growing somewhere, but most of us have lost the true relationship to that growth, and therefore, lost our true connection with food..."

The System


"In learning about how to take care of plants, we also learn how to take care of ourselves. Plants teach us to unlearn and relearn: Humans are constantly surprised by fragile but adaptive ecological systems. This fragile nature and the ability to adapt and transform is something that we have in ourselves and see in each other as well, but we often need an object or story to remind us..."

The System


"In learning about how to take care of plants, we also learn how to take care of ourselves. Plants teach us to unlearn and relearn: Humans are constantly surprised by fragile but adaptive ecological systems. This fragile nature and the ability to adapt and transform is something that we have in ourselves and see in each other as well, but we often need an object or story to remind us..."

design // biology

Hydroponic Kitchen is the thesis work of Mado Todd-Morel (Masters of Industrial Design, RISD, 2015). Focusing on issues of sustainability, education, and ritual, Mado explores the future of fine herb gardens using hand-blown glass vessels to enhance and magnify the visual context of sprouting and growth in the home setting.

Hydroponic Kitchen intersects with our ever changing food system and addresses how our relationship to food parallels our relationship to the growing world. Using forgotten and neglected indoor spaces such as interior corners, plants grow with focused light from windows and mirrors, thriving in areas that would otherwise be lost in darkness. 

investigate // experience

Hydroponic Kitchen offers the beginning of a new way to discover the beauty in the unseen parts of the natural root system through lenses and vessels, enhancing the biological growth system to glorify the food tasting experience...

Greenery.JPG

Seen // Unseen


Using glass vessels with hydroponic techniques allows users to be exposed to the root systems of plants as they grow. This allows for discovery of the intricate beauty in the normally unseen parts. Function dictates the forms, and education to the process is inherent.

Seen // Unseen


Using glass vessels with hydroponic techniques allows users to be exposed to the root systems of plants as they grow. This allows for discovery of the intricate beauty in the normally unseen parts. Function dictates the forms, and education to the process is inherent.

"When you really think about it, water and sunlight are at the very beginning of every meal. I have tried to reacquaint people with this origin. Displaying the beautiful biology of hydroponic growth through glass, I have tried to sculpt the aesthetics and defined the system of a future indoor garden - a garden that reacquaints and reconnects."

click here to read the story of hydroponic kitchen >>

8.jpg

Sketches


Selected watercolors and marker renderings from the design process

Sketches


Selected watercolors and marker renderings from the design process

Mado_fenetre.jpg

About Mado


"Part of being a designer is being an active futurist, actually shaping the world we intend to pass on. I am interested in flexibilty - of materials, processes and ideas. On the human scale, we simply call this adaptation."

About Mado


"Part of being a designer is being an active futurist, actually shaping the world we intend to pass on. I am interested in flexibilty - of materials, processes and ideas. On the human scale, we simply call this adaptation."

Mado Todd-Morel is self-described as being an artist trapped in a designer's body.

Franco-American, she was born and raised on a barrier island in Normandy, France. Mado has always had an immediate connection to nature - from her family's garden, to the nearby ocean, to her summers spent in rural upstate, New York. She grew up swimming, exploring, and playing in the woods. This connection to the natural world continues to drive her pursuits.

Mado earned her undergraduate degree at the Ecole Superieur d' Art et de Design de Reims, where she majored in Product and Space Design. She went on to receive her Master's of Industrial Design from RISD in 2015. Her primary interests in design focus on how to reuse, transform and re-appropriate the elements of our environment, making simple components unite to create something more complex.

Mado is consistently working in food design - an arena of design focused on the growth, preparation of foods, the sensual and temporal contexts of meals, and the way we present them and consume them. Food design itself is a discipline that is fairly new and constantly evolving, forcing its principles to change and shift, respond and react. Mado uses play and discovery as major elements in her work to communicate how she currently sees the world, and how she intends to shape it.

Combining her love of nature, passion for glass, and desire to adapt, Mado has created a system in Hydroponic Kitchen that exists in tomorrow's home - a system designed to bring one's garden indoors, necessarily and beautifully.

 
Mado_Scope.jpg
 

See more of Mado's work at: mado-todd-morel.com